Printed Books Rebound and Endures Digital Fad

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“Adult readership of print books actually rebounded last year [2013], after a period of decline, according to the study by Princeton Survey Research Associates International on behalf of the Pew Research Center. While 28% of adults had read an e-book in the last year, 69% had read a print book, and reading overall was up.

‘Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits,’ Pew researchers wrote in a release on the survey’s results. ‘Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are “e-book only.”‘ Overall, 89% of those who had read an e-book had also read a book in print.

The survey was conducted Jan. 2-5 and is based on a nationwide sample of 1,005 adults. (The study thus captured the spread of tablet devices after the 2013 holiday gift season).  Exactly half of all American adults now own either a tablet computer such as an iPad, or an e-reader such as a Kindle or Nook for reading e-books. That figure is up from 43% in September.

The percentage of Americans who’ve read an e-book has increased dramatically over the course of three surveys released in 2011, 2012 and 2014. In the 2011 report, just 17% of adults had read an e-book.”

The P.A. Hutchison Company has perfected print manufacturing over its 100 plus years in business. Show your printed support! Call today and place your order.

Information was taken from this article: http://articles.latimes.com/2014/jan/16/entertainment/la-et-jc-ebooks-on-the-rise-but-print-books-rebound-and-endure-20140116

Want a Happy Student? Choose Print

girl reading

American university students this spring still are using printed textbooks far more than eTexts. In 2010, it was predicted eTexts would rise from 2 percent of college course materials to more than 18 percent after 2014. It didn’t happen.

In the study “Student Reading Practices in Print and Electronic Media” to be published in the journal College & Research Libraries in September 2014, researchers tracked the reading habits of juniors, seniors and graduate students at the College of New York. Although students used electronic media for non-academic reading, they relied on paper for academics.

There are “a lot of misconceptions about millennials” as a digital generation, according to researcher Nancy Foasberg who led the study. The Chronicle of Higher Education reported on Foasberg’s research: “Several students in Ms. Foasberg’s study expressed a distaste for digital textbooks. Some who had used e-books said they would not use them again because they found the embedded links distracting and because they could not interact with the content as they could with print texts — highlighting or taking notes in the margins, for instance. And since the students found themselves printing out digital texts, whatever money they had saved by not buying printed copies was largely lost to printing costs.”

Another writer, Ferris Jabr, details the extensive research during the last two years that confirms the science behind students’ intuitive preference for printed text. In the November issue of Scientific American, Jabr lays out the shortcomings of reading from screens in “Why the Brain Prefers Print.” Summarizing recent research from Tufts University, Indiana University, University of Stavanger (Norway), Karlstad University (Sweden), Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, University of Leicester, University of Central Florida and San Jose State University, the downsides of reading on-screen are piling up.

Research indicates the brain treats words as physical objects which have a placement on a page but are fleeting on screen. Measures of brain activity are high when a student writes letters by hand, but not when they are typed. Many of us experience “drifting away” while scrolling. Research shows scrolling promotes shallow reading and reduces comprehension. Text provides us with both “deep reading” and context.

Reading printed text is “less taxing cognitively” and provides us with “more free capacity for comprehension.” Reading on the Kindle “ink” format that imitates paper is less taxing than reading the backlit screens of other readers, cellphones, tablets and computer screens. Indeed, most readers report higher levels of stress, eye strain and scrolling that “drains more mental resources.”

Researchers found screens promote browsing, taking shortcuts and scanning. Readers of print are much more likely to re-read and check for understanding.

For college students, the bottom line is: “Will the format affect my test scores?” Researchers found “volunteers using paper scored about 10 percentage points higher … students using paper approached the exam with a more studious attitude than their screen-reading peers.” Under both modes, students could superficially “remember,” but those studying printed text “knew with certainty,” a trait likely related to the deep-reading of print.

Will the next “digital generation” avoid this difference and be better adapted to screens? Even with young children, researchers found the screens got in the way. Children were distracted into fiddling with the knobs on the device and otherwise being distracted by the technology.

Despite a decade of hype, American college students appear to agree with the survey of students at the National Autonomous University of Mexico where 80 percent of students preferred print to screen in order to “understand with clarity.”

John Richard Schrock is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Emporia State University.

Article taken from: http://hdnews.net/opinion/schrock021714

So do not wait! Contact The P.A. Hutchison Company to get your printed order in today!

Make Your Brain Happy and Choose Print

Scientific America Why the Brain Prefers Print-page-0

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“Since the 1980s, there have been more than 100 comparative studies in the United States, U.K. Taiwan, Sweden, Norway, France and Japan to explore differences of how people read and comprehend on paper versus screens.  While technology has continued to improve, it still hasn’t reached the comprehension level of traditional paper users.  What we have learned from these studies is that readers prefer real paper over its electronic counterpart and achieve high levels of comprehension and retention with paper.

Paper not only has inherent environmental features such as high recyclability, carbon storage, and a renewable primary raw material (wood, recycled and alternative fibers), it also fills a key societal role by helping readers create their own unique experience whether it is through learning and study habits or getting personally involved in a work of fiction.  It is less distracting and allows the reader to focus on the text.  The absence of multi-tasking leads to a greater understanding of the subject matter and in turn creates a memorable experience.”

To learn more, read the full article here: http://twosidesus.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/scientific-american-why-the-brain-prefers-paper/

Save Money with Tree of Printed BOOKS!

 4 art book

Every holiday season, millions of people buy trees to decorate their homes. Whether this be a tradition, a religious homage, or simply to add aesthetics, holiday trees are a beautiful addition to homes and buildings.

Unfortunately, trees could be costly, especially in cities where trees are not prevalent. Even the price of artificial trees could be damaging to your wallet! We have the perfect solution. In an effort to save money, create a tree using materials in your own house. Seem impossible? It’s actually quite easy.

Collect all the printed books from around your house; gather all different sizes and and titles. Group together books of similar spine diameters and begin building a base for your tree. If you don’t have many books, a large circle of printed materials is not necessary, just arrage books in a triangle. If you have a plentiful amount of books, create the base by arranging a circle or square of books. Next, continue building up and narrowing each level of books to create the shape of a tree. Lastly, stand your favorite book on top of the book tree. Leave plain or dangle a strand of lights around the printed tree to create a beautiful glow.

Printed books are not only, beautiful, but they are GREEN too! Forests managed by responsible forests can actually preserve the habitats of endangered species and paper companies typically plant three trees for every one they harvest! (“The Truth about Paper,” by Martha Spizziri)

Create your printed tree today, there’s no reason not to! Who doesn’t want to save a few extra bucks?!

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Nearly 70% Unlikely to Give Up Printed Books

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Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone, yet Santa still has difficult-to-buy-for names on his Nice List. If you want to buy someone a luxury gift this holiday season, consider giving a printed book. “Print is a luxury item with an emotional connection,” Marco Boer, VP of I.T. Strategies, told MyPRINTResource.com in a pre-Thanksgiving interview. “Local history books are making a comeback,” he said, “as are family cookbooks.”

Boer’s research firm has released details of a new study, commissioned by Ricoh and introduced at its “Next Chapter” event last month. The report, entitled The Evolution of the Book Industry: Implications for U.S. Book Manufacturers and Printers, reveals some unexpected findings, including that “most consumers do not see themselves giving up print books due to the benefits the physical form offers. Nearly 70 percent of consumers feel it is unlikely that they’ll give up on printed books by 2016. Consumers have an emotional and visceral/sensory attachment to printed books, potentially elevating them to a luxury item.”

Additionally the research, conducted in conjunction with the University of Colorado, shows that college students prefer printed textbooks to e-books “for their ability to concentrate on the subject matter at hand.” Electronic display devices, such as Apple iPads and tablet PCs, tend to tempt students to distraction, respondents said. Separate research from the Sesame Workshop studied younger children (three to six years of age) and found that parent-child pairs engaged less with story content when reading enhanced e-books than when reading printed books. In addition, the children who read enhanced e-books recalled fewer narrative details than children who read the print version of the same story.

Two other key findings of the new I.T. Strategies/Ricoh study:

•Eye/screen fatigue and a love of the print medium lead to an overall positive outlook for the printed book.

•Three of five e-books downloaded are never read.

So what are you waiting for? Choose PRINT! Finish your holiday shopping with the printed book. Never out of style and the perfect fit for all people, printed books are the perfect gift for your holiday buying.

 

Excerpt taken from, “Printed Books Hold Their Ground,” by Mark Vruno. Read the full article here: http://www.myprintresource.com/article/11269152/e-book-popularity-plateaus-while-print-grows?utm_source=Quick+Printing+Weekly+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GRVDB131204002

Avoid Giving Damaging Screens for Holiday Gifts

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Stagnant development in personality growth, inexperience in human interaction, and brain damage, are traumatic conditions that are undesirable to all people. Most parents will do anything in their power to help their children achieve the absolute best. One easy tip for parents who want their kids to excel: rethink handing over your electronic devices to your children.

Unfortunately, it is often hard to find objective information about the pros and cons of using screen technology in young children since most of the information available comes from companies whose profits depend on the sales of those devices. Skilled Marketing Specialists around the world have been so smart as to label new technologies- such as smart phones, tablets, as e-books- as “interactive” to make it appear far more intellectual and beneficial than its predecessors of the “old technologies” such as television and video games.[1]

However, despite the arduous task of discovering unbiased information, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Child was able to uncover plenty of enough information and submit report which displayed the staggering results of electronic screens and children.[2]

To date, research tells us that screen time has no real benefit for infants and toddlers; for older children, the nature of the content they experience and the amount of time they spend with screens are things to be greatly considered. “Games and digital activities that limit children to a predetermined set of responses have been shown to diminish creativity. Exposure to media violence is linked to aggression, desensitization to violence, and lack of empathy for victims. Media violence is also associated with poor school performance.”[3]

Even the visual aspects of screen watching can have adverse effects; preschoolers who watched 20 minutes of a fast paced cartoon show has shown a negative impact on executive function skills, including attention, the ability to delay gratification, self-regulation, and problem solving.[4] Campaign for a Commercial-Free Child reported preschoolers spend anywhere from at least 2.2 hours to as much as 4.6 hours per day with screen media.[5]

“Research tells us that developing children thrive when they are talked to, read to, played with and given time for creative play, physically active play, and interactions with other children and adults.”[6] Knowing this, it could be translated that placing an electronic screen in front of your child does not ignite development. In fact, limiting a child’s time with an electronic screen is as important as monitoring its content.

Extensive screen time has been linked to childhood obesity, sleep disturbance, and learning, attention, and social problems. Screen time takes away from what is important and healthy for a child’s development and growth; it takes children away from hands-on creative play that develops imagination and creativity; it also takes children away from caring adults. “The so-called interactive electronic books- in which screen images respond to touch with sound effects or words or simple movements- are less likely to induce the kind of adult-child interactions that promote literacy than traditional books do.[7]

Do not choose electronic screens; they only inhibit children from their full potential. Be responsible and care. Julia Steiny, the founding director of the Youth Restoration Project, explains, “…letting children get sucked down the rabbit hole of e-entertainment is parental misbehavior. Facts are stacking up.”[8] Studies and reports show how important interactions are between parents and children; choose a healthy and beneficial activity such as reading — printed books — after seeing the devastating causes of electronic screen use.

The P.A. Hutchison Company has been providing printing excellence since 1911. Contact us today to order your print and to choose against electronic media.

Choose print for your holiday gifts!

Hardworking Proofer Retires After Nearly 20 Years of Valuable Service

Lois Depew, a hardworking and dedicated employee retired from The P.A. Hutchison Company. Lois was a crucial part of the Prepress Department and worked as a Proofer ensuring there were no errors on our customers’ proofs.

The P.A. Hutchison Company could not say thank you enough to Lois who gave her best efforts for 19 years! We wish Lois the best of luck in her retirement and she will be greatly missed.

There’s no better way to celebrate an achievement or milestone than by eating cake… And that’s exactly what we did!! Here are some of the photos from Lois’ retirement party.

Lois 11 Lois 10

Lois and Director of Sales & Administration, Erin Jones, chatting and laughing before everyone arrived to the gathering.

 Lois 8  Lois 6

A few P.A. Hutch workers gather to thank Lois for her service and dedication.

   Lois 2

Please don’t mind our painter’s tape! We just remodeled our lunchroom.

Follow us in Being Green and Choose PRINT! Support our family-owned company and let us take care of your printing needs.

P.A. Hutch’s November Travels

Print, print, and more print! There are few things we love more than meeting new print lovers; this November, members of The P.A. Hutchison Company have been to visit two different trade shows allowing us to meet hundreds of new faces!

Jeff McDonald and John Jajich, two of our National Sales Representatives, traveled to New Mexico to attend PubWest 2013 November 7-9th. PubWest is a dynamic trade association of book publishers, printers, graphic designers, binderies, and related editorial and marketing service companies. Established in 1977 as the Rocky Mountain Book Publishers Association, PubWest (Publishers Association of the West) is now dedicated to the advancement of its members and the publishing profession. Jeff and John were able to meet print buyers from new companies and see old friends.

John & Jeff, Pubwest 2013

Vita Ranella, Marketing Specialist, and Bob Deal, National Accounts Representative traveled to The Atlantic City Convention Center to attend NJEA 2013 held November 7-8th. NJEA, The New Jersey Education Association, is a diverse organization working to create an optimal environment to achieve excellence in public education in New Jersey. After viewing the many print samples we had displayed, several educators commented how those same books, ones The P.A. Hutchison Company have manufactured, are used daily in their classroom. Bob and Vita were able to travel down, “Author’s Alley,” and meet with self-publishers and avid print lovers.

Vita & Bob, NJEA 2013

The P.A. Hutchison Company is a family-owned printing company that has been in business OVER 100 years. Be Green and Choose PRINT!

Do you know of a trade show that we could attend? Let us know and we will visit you! Contact Vita at Vranella@pahutch.com

http://www.njea.org/

http://pubwest.org/

Screen Time Linked to Childhood Health & Social Issues

infant_ipad

Stagnant development in personality growth, inexperience in human interaction, and brain damage, are a few of parents’ worst nightmares. Most parents want the absolute best for their children and will try to help them achieve this any way possible. One easy tip: rethink handing over your electronic devices to your children.

Unfortunately, it is often hard to find objective information about the pros and cons of using screen technology in young children since most of the information available comes from companies whose profits depend on the sales of those devices. Skilled Marketing Specialists around the world have been so smart as to label new technologies- such as smart phones, tablets, as e-books- “interactive” to make them appear far more intellectual and beneficial than its predecessors of the “old technologies” such as television and video games.[1]

However, despite the arduous task of discovering unbiased information, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Child was able to uncover plenty of enough information and submit report which displayed the staggering results of electronic screens and children.[2]

To date, research tells us that screen time has no real benefit for infants and toddlers; for older children, the nature of the content they experience and the amount of time they spend with screens are things to be greatly considered. “Games and digital activities that limit children to a predetermined set of responses have been shown to diminish creativity. Exposure to media violence is linked to aggression, desensitization to violence, and lack of empathy for victims. Media violence is also associated with poor school performance.”[3]

Even the visual aspects of screen watching can have adverse effects; preschoolers who watched 20 minutes of a fast paced cartoon show has shown a negative impact on executive function skills, including attention, the ability to delay gratification, self-regulation, and problem solving.[4] Campaign for a Commercial-Free Child reported preschoolers spend anywhere from at least 2.2 hours to as much as 4.6 hours per day with screen media.[5]

“Research tells us that developing children thrive when they are talked to, read to, played with and given time for creative play, physically active play, and interactions with other children and adults.”[6] Knowing this, it could be translated that placing an electronic screen in front of your child does not ignite development. In fact, limiting a child’s time with an electronic screen is as important as monitoring its content.

Extensive screen time has been linked to childhood obesity, sleep disturbance, and learning, attention, and social problems. Screen time takes away from what is important and healthy for a child’s development and growth; it takes children away from hands-on creative play that develops imagination and creativity; it also takes children away from caring adults. “The so-called interactive electronic books- in which screen images respond to touch with sound effects or words or simple movements- are less likely to induce the kind of adult-child interactions that promote literacy than traditional books do.[7]

Do not choose electronic screens; they only inhibit children from their full potential. Be responsible and care. Julia Steiny, the founding director of the Youth Restoration Project, explains, “…letting children get sucked down the rabbit hole of e-entertainment is parental misbehavior. Facts are stacking up.”[8] Studies and reports show how important interactions are between parents and children; choose a healthy and beneficial activity such as reading — printed books — after seeing the devastating causes of electronic screen use.

The P.A. Hutchison Company has been providing printing excellence since 1911. Contact us today to order your print and to “say NO” to electronic media.

Read Campaign for a Commercial-Free Child’s full report here: http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org/sites/default/files/facingthescreendilemma.pdf

“Books Will Bring Us Together”

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Are you a bookworm trying to meet new people? Or are you maybe a more casual reader looking for a stimulating conversation with new friends? Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar in Seattle, Washington may have the perfect activity for you. Don’t let Vermillion’s name fool you; we are not talking about a stringent art critique amongst wine lovers.

“Movable Type Mixer” occurs on a quarterly basis at Vermillion. The next event is happening this month on Wednesday, October 23 at 7:30pm in PDT.[1] It’s a social gathering between old friends, new acquaintances, and everyone in between. With no cover charge, public speaking requirements, or intrusive questions on your personal life, Movable Mixer is the perfect place for a leisurely activity to meet new people. The only requirement is to bring the printed book you are reading and be open to discuss it. Quite simple isn’t it?

Movable Type is not discriminatory against casual readers. Anyone reading any sort of book is welcome! No matter how many books a person reads, he or she is encouraged to join the group. Paul Constant explains, “I’ve talked with nice people about Kafka and Stephen King and a memoir about a peculiar cat and urban planning, and I felt a wave of euphoria when I saw a woman carrying a beautiful new edition of Jim Dodge’s bighearted, bizarre novella Fup. It’s practically impossible to have a bad time.[2]

Founder Amy Levenson has worked in international publishing for nine years. Levenson believes “books are the one topic that can pump all the awkwardness out of a stiff social situation.” She got the idea for the discussion group while in Europe after stumbling across a monthly book club meeting in a Parisian bar. “’Book clubs are usually small and private,” she explains, but “the idea of expanding one to anybody who wanted to come makes it completely unpredictable.”’ Upon moving to Seattle, Levenson realized it was the perfect place to start an open book gathering.[3]

Weary on talking to someone you don’t know? Levenson proposes this food for thought, “Even if people can’t look at your face, they’ll look at your book and talk about it,” she says.[4]

Printed books bring people together; they enable introductions to be stress-free and intriguing. Strangers, who assume to have nothing in common with one another, are soon chatting over their latest novel with a new acquaintance and friend at Vermillion. Support print and support this friendly community event.

Continue the Choose Print Movement and get your orders in today!